I am a 4th year dietetic student, living in Las Vegas, working on my wellness journey. I am a certified personal trainer, certified group fitness trainer, and CrossFit L2 certified. After traveling and training military all over the world, I now create customized online training and nutrition programs from home. I have reached a point in my life, where I am truly living my best life.

Most athletes respond best to a high frequency and high volume of Weightlifting and perform best when not handling maximum poundages at each session.

The Heavy-Light-Medium training system gives the athlete the volume and frequency that they need to drive progress, and ensure ongoing success while allowing enough recovery for one heavy day each week for maximum output. The benefit that this program has for athletes cannot be overstated.  Non-barbell sports athletes must balance training for their sport and training in the weight room. Most sports are demanding of the lower body and many athletes will not have enough reserves in their tank to squat heavy more than once per week. The HLM system allows the athlete to place their heavy squat day on the day of the week that allows them to train in their most recovered state. During the rest of the week, the athletes will have to perform strength workouts in a state of fatigue. The HLM system makes this a little easier to manage. On the light and medium days, the athlete will be focusing on form and technique, and speed.

As a starting point though, start your light day 10-20% lower than your heavy day, and set your medium day 5-10%  less than your heavy day.

I often get asked about weightlifting shoes. Are they really worth the investment? I always reply the same way- Would an avid runner wear shoes that are made for hiking? Probably not. Shoes are designed for specific sports and activities. Running shoes have an inbuilt cushion to absorb impact with each step you take. Although this is great for running, it’s not so great for Weightlifting. Rather than absorb force, you need a shoe that will help you use all the force your body produces to help you move the weight. The more force you can produce, the more weight you can move. This is especially important in Olympic Lifts.

Weightlifting shoes have a raised heel. This is a massive advantage, as it allows you to squat into a deeper position through an increased ankle range of motion. This will help you to improve your overall position too, as you’ll find yourself sitting more upright. A more upright torso means more chance of keeping hold of the barbell in the correct plane and sending it in the right direction-up.

Weightlifting shoes are also extremely stable, not just underfoot, but around your foot. This ensures a strong and consistent base to land on, push through, and push into- exceptional performance and injury prevention.

Weightlifting shoes are more stable than your typical barefoot or minimalist shoe. The concept of these shoes having little or no padding is definitely in the right direction (and I had personally rather wear this type of shoe when performing the Deadlift, ensuring maximal force through the ground), but while performing other major lifts (The Clean and Jerk, Snatch and Squat), I personally think weightlifting shoes are more beneficial.

 

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If your ab training still consists of chasing some arbitrary number, like the old-school idea of 100 or 200-plus daily reps of various exercises, then maybe its time to rethink your approach. Volume alone won’t carve out your abs. Even if you’re not stuck in an outdated mindset, you can still reap the benefits of adding toes to bar to your workouts.

If you’re not familiar with the exercise, you have probably seen the movement performed. An athlete hanging straight down from a pull-up bar and swinging his feet up to touch the bar for multiple reps. Calling this move “dynamic” sells it short—it not only places incredible demands on your core muscles, but it also builds your grip, arm, and shoulder strength. The move is trickier than it looks, though, so be sure to follow these tips for proper setup and execution.

Toes to Bar in 5 Steps

Grip
Place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width, wrapping your thumbs for a secure grip—when you kick your feet up, you don’t want to kick your hands.

Flex
Squeeze both your butt and abs, creating a “hollow-body” position where your feet are slightly in front of your torso. With these muscles flexed, your body’s ready to swing.

Transition
To transition from backswing to upswing, simply drive your knees toward your elbows, then extend your legs, kicking your feet toward the bar as they rise.

Downswing
As soon as your momentum toward the bar ends, pull back into an arc and squeeze your butt to load your hips for the next rep.

When it comes to training, concentration with a 100 percent focus is crucial to reach greater intensity levels. The first step is to really believe that becoming stronger and faster is possible. In the same way, you can command your body to push further when everything else suggests that you cannot. In the same way, you can mentally coax your body to train harder and with more intensity. Athletes are masters of mind power or at least they should be if they want to be exceptionally focused. 

So how do we get the power of our minds to remove the fear?
Athletes need to focus on winning. Their focus should be on doing everything they can to win. That means tuning out any spectators, any fears, and even their opponent. This is what allows a professional to be successful and what compels so many to stay in the ranks of being an amateur.

So if you’re an athlete get focused on being the master of your sport. Apply the power of your mind to help you stay focused on your competition and your ability. Sure there will be fears and there will be distractions, but when these come up you need to focus your mind and focus on your abilities.

Athletes participating in various sports almost always engage in strength training in order to make themselves stronger and better players.

Most sports skills are performed by applying a force from your feet and using this to help propel you into the air or forward. The more force you apply through your feet, the more force will be directed back at you, therefore allowing you to move faster and thus be more effective. This principle applies very commonly in most sports. Therefore, if your sport includes actions where you need to generate maximum power upward, it is a good idea to include these types of movements in your training: clean and jerks, snatches, squats, lunges, and deadlifts.

Exercises that utilize many joints that make up the body will usually be more beneficial in your training than the more isolated exercises (unless of course your goal is to strengthen one specific muscle). These types of exercises will utilize more total muscle fibers, thus strengthening the body more and allowing you to generate more total force. You will also be working more of your neuromuscular system which helps your body to be ready at all times. To generate explosive force, the body recruits motor units. Motor units consist of the motor nerve and all the muscle fibers that it controls. The more muscle fibers that are controlled by a motor unit, the more explosive force you will be able to generate.
When we train explosively, we train the nervous system to recruit more motor units, which will help make you a better player. Motor units also come in fast-twitch and slow-twitch types, and explosive training will help you to recruit faster twitch motor units which generate up to 4 times more force than slow-twitch.

Progressive Overload is a common principle often heard in any training program as it applies to everyone. In order to see results from your program, you must be providing the muscles with an overloading stimulus. This will create small micro-tears in the muscle tissue which your body will then repair and rebuild stronger so that if it encounters the same stimulus again it will be better able to handle it. You can either apply an overload by increases to the weight you are lifting or increases to the number of repetitions you are lifting the weight for. By increasing the weight you will train your body to grow stronger and more powerful, while by increasing the number of repetitions you will train for muscular endurance and size (assuming you are keeping the repetitions in the 8-15 range).

When training any athlete to become stronger and more proficient in their chosen sport it is important to take into consideration many factors. What is most important is that your training closely resembles the actions you will be later performing. With proper strength training and periodization planning, I can take my athletes to new highs, and ensure it is in a healthy way.

My motivation for any type of competition or race stems from the thrill of the excitement of pushing myself past the comfort of what feels capable.
I didn’t realize what I was creating within myself when I began racing and competing. I still remember the fear I felt when swimming the final meters in my first triathlon, the nervousness in my gut when the gun went off at the start of my first half marathon, the feeling of being petrified when the time came to scale my first 10ft wall, and the tremble in my legs when I walked across my first stage. Scared, afraid, and nervous. These were all of the emotions that made me face my biggest fear of all, the fear of being just mediocre. This feeling is what drives me every day. This is why I train and train hard. The fear of never pushing myself to achieve personal greatness is simply unacceptable.

We often cast our dreams aside out of fear of being critiqued. Some people live their entire life never really being alive. They never take risks and never put themselves on display out of fear of looking vulnerable. If you never feel the pain of defeat, how can you truly appreciate the pride that comes with the attempt?

In competition, even in training, the fear of being scrutinized or criticized will lead to failure. Top tier athletes are created when one finds the ability to choose personal greatness. You become what you conceive, build, and launch. So build greatness and never settle for being just mediocre.

We’re all asked this time of year ‘what are your goals or resolutions?’
A new year exemplifies a fresh start- a new chapter- new beginnings-
A perfect time to put forth effort into something that perhaps scares us or tests our strengths and weaknesses. What better time than a new year!
I personally love setting new goals and challenges at the beginning of a new year. I am a person that believes 100% in doing something daily to take myself out of my comfort zone. My greatest accomplishments to date have been the ones that scared me the most. Fear is our biggest enemy. To be brave takes courage and strength. Fear causes doubt that tells us we can’t, we’re not good enough or we will fail. Courage is facing our fears. Accepting the fact that I may not be the best, but I’ll be damned if I don’t put forth my very best.
My goal every year as a human being is to be better than the year before- and this applies to all aspects of my life and in everything I do. My first and foremost goal is to simply be a good and decent person- to be compassionate, loving and nonjudgmental at all costs. It’s not always easy, but each day and year it gets easier. To be good is something that I don’t have too much pride to say- can at times be testing- being genuinely good in this world can be difficult at times.
My second goal that plays yearly on repeat- Worry less about what others think. I came to terms a long time ago with the fact that not everyone will like me- and that’s okay! We are all different personalities- we all have different outlooks, beliefs, and lifestyles. Not everyone will agree with the way I live my life or the decisions I choose, but that’s just it- it’s my life and no matter what path I choose- there will always be someone who supports it and others that don’t. Most importantly, as long as the God that I serve makes me feel okay with my life’s choices…that’s okay with me.
And finally, to grow stronger mentally and physically. For anyone that has participated especially in endurance sports or training can understand the power of a strong mind. I know personally, mental strength can be my most powerful source or my biggest enemy. Second-tier athletes become top competitors when they train their minds to surpass their physical strength. Once this type of control is understood; applying it to daily life situations is empowering.
I have enormous strength- and in order to use it in a positive manner, I set goals for myself- whether it be yearly or daily, these goals keep me focused. As long as I keep looking forward, I know I’m always headed in the right direction.

New Year’s Eve was spent dining with friends at Giardino Della Serenissima, Sacile, Italy. We ended up downtown in the Sacile square to ring in the new year. Another amazing chapter in our lives begins!!

 

I woke this morning to gear up my new ruck pack and realized I had to wrap the weight differently to accommodate the size. The rewrap set me back on time, so I didn’t thoroughly test my pack, bad move! I headed out on my hike and 2 miles in, my straps were slipping, my traps were burning (and not from the 30Lb load on my back) but the awkward way the sack was slinging. Another 2 miles in and my front support strap completely unhooked. At this point, I felt like I had an awkward monkey on my back and my turtle pace speed walk at 5mph was doing nothing for my endurance. So, another couple of miles and I called it a day. I headed straight to the Army/Navy Surplus store and bought some old used straps and clasps. Now after jumping up and down like a crazy person and a couple of handstands, she rides like a dream, AROO!

Finally, after falling asleep this morning at 3am, I was up and at it by 7.
As soon as my feet hit the floor, I slammed a protein drink and headed out the door.
I walked a good, fast pace for a mile to warm up a bit, then a 2-mile run to follow.
After, I took a 30-minute break, loaded up my ruck with 25Lbs and out for another 3-mile walk/run combo.
I didn’t track meals today. I allowed myself as much fruit, yogurt, chicken, and sweet potatoes as I wanted. Maybe even a few Tbsp’s of Peanut Butter. I could feel my body needed it a nice little re-feed. Now tonight, I should sleep like a baby!

Go ruck is just around the corner, I can’t wait!

Today I completed the Reebok Super Spartan in the mountains of South Korea. It was absolutely, hands down the hardest race I have EVER taken part in. I loved every minute!
This was the first race I have ever taken part in that didn’t have designated water stops. You would occasionally see a gourd dipper laying at the foot of a flowing stream down the mountainside, but out of fear of shitting my pants, I passed after one sip.

I remember listening to the sound of my heartbeat and trying to match each beat with a step and telling myself to just keep going. As I made my way over the second 10ft wall, I was informed that I was the first female- that’s all I needed to hear. I wasn’t letting anyone pass me! First overall female in my heat, AROO!!

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Hello, I’m Tiffany! I am a southern girl, born and raised in Alabama. I grew up riding 4-wheelers down old dirt roads, and while my music genre of choice has shifted a bit since high school, my favorite band will always be The Alabama Boys. I played sports in my early teens, but it was the year 2000 when my fitness journey truly began. I became a certified personal trainer and group fitness instructor and began working at the gym where I began cleaning sunbeds. Soon after, I began training for my first triathlon and became obsessed with the capabilities of the human body when pushed to its limits. Within a couple of years, I was presented with the opportunity to purchase the gym I trained at, and it’s been a continuous grind ever since. In 2006 however, I decided it was time for a new adventure, so I sold the gym, packed up my Jeep, and headed toward the beach. I moved to Destin, Florida where I fell in love with my husband and the sport of CrossFit.

After seven years of beach life, we were off to Osan, Korea. I dedicated all of my time to training and studying and began competing in fitness competitions. To feed fuel to the fire of my competitiveness, I began Obstacle Racing. This passion for adventure led me into over 20 incredible racing adventures, in five countries, on three continents.

After a stay in South Korea, we were off to Italy where I faced my biggest adventure to date, coaching CrossFit at Aviano Air Force Base (oh yeah, did I mention that’s why we move around so much, my husband is military). I took on coaching and programming for the next three years. My time in Italy was spent racing, competing, and coaching, and in between, I squeezed in some school work. I decided to use my time overseas to go back to school and study my greatest passion, Nutrition.

We currently live in Las Vegas, Nevada where I create customized training and nutrition programs for those looking to create healthier habits.