Hey guys! Jumping right into today’s post, I want to address some questions that I frequently get asked regarding my vegetarian journey.

  1. Do you eat any meat at all? What type of vegetarian are you?
    Technically speaking (giggles), I am considered to be a lacto-ovo-pescatarian. That’s a mouthful, and that is why I just deem myself “vegetarian” unless someone wants specifics. This means that I eat some dairy (yogurt, cheese and the occasional chocolate milk following a workout), eggs, and fish.
  2. How long have you been vegetarian?
    It’s been a fairly slow and steady process over the last few years. I cut out red meat and pork a couple of years ago, and I decided to cut out all other forms of meat 13 months ago.
  3. Do you ever want to eat meat? Have you had any slip ups or “surprise” meat dishes?
    I have had chicken probably a total of 5 times over the last year. This was by choice, and not necessarily because I had a “meat craving,” but because my body felt extremely fatigued, and I was having excessive bruising. This led me to believe that I was lacking in iron, and unfortunately spinach, seeds and lentils (typically good sources of iron), weren’t doing the trick.  I found however I didn’t enjoy the texture or the flavor of chicken once re-introduced. I did have a huge craving for red meat just about a month ago. I actually planned on eating a Five Guys burger for my birthday when on vacation, but ended up passing.
  4. Why did you decide to become a vegetarian?
    I think people often assume it has to do with a love of animals. Don’t get me wrong, if I had a pasture of cows, or a yard full of chickens, I probably couldn’t feed them, see them everyday, and then turn around and serve them up for dinner; however cruelty to animals wasn’t my first deciding factor. I cut out pork years ago because of the mere fact that I think pigs are disgusting animals (I am absolutely certain that someone will DM me with lots of kind words over that one), but that is my truth. The real deciding factor for me came about when I was doing research for school. Most of my followers know, but if you’re new to my blog (hello, welcome, and thanks for stopping in), I am a dietetics student focusing on sports nutrition, and am obsessed with the power of food. After numerous studies, I decided that a vegetarian diet may be a good suit for me. I have had sensitivities to numerous foods over the years and once I adjusted to this way of eating, it seemed to work well for me.
  5. Do you think that a vegetarian diet would work well for everyone?
    You have to ask yourself the most important question when it comes to determining  if this lifestyle would work for you, “do you love vegetables?” I mean really. love. vegetables. If you would have asked me this question 7 or 8 years ago my answer would have been completely different than what it is now. Personally, yes, I love vegetables! I mean I really. love. vegetables: broccoli, zucchini, cauliflower, eggplant, carrots, sprouts, asparagus, peppers, and the list goes on. All of it. I love all of it. I think people often get the misconception that vegetarians fill up on carbs in the forms of breads, fruits, and pastas. While yes, I do occasionally include these within my meals, people often take for granted that vegetables are carbs too.
  6. What are your forms of protein? Do you find it hard to get in enough protein?
    I mostly rely on eggs (primarily egg whites), and fish. I eat eggs every single day, usually twice a day (at least), and I allow for fish about three times a week. I eat a lot of rice and beans, which most people don’t know make for a complete, well-rounded protein. Many vegetables contain a lot of protein as well. If I were under the age of 30 I wouldn’t worry so much with adding in additional protein, but now that I am at an age where protein intake is extremely important, I typically have 1-2 protein shakes  per day.
  7. Do you find that you get bored with a vegetarian diet?
    In fact, for me it’s the complete opposite. I feel that my choices are endless; however, this leads back to the fact that I love vegetables.
  8. Do you eat Tofu, veggie burgers, and imitation meat products?
    I will occasionally eat Tofu if I order out, but I haven’t mastered cooking it myself quite yet. I recently saved some recipes on Pinterest for the air fryer, so fingers crossed I can find some tasty methods. I love Veggie Burgers! Again, this is when dining out though. I have found that most sit-down dining restaurants (at least in Vegas), offer a veggie burger of some kind. I typically choose this option if available on the menu, but I don’t usually prepare them at home. When I first transitioned into this way of eating, I did find myself eating frozen veggie patties, imitation chicken, and soy burgers; however, over the last few months I have cut these things out. The taste was great, but the sodium content was usually insane.
  9. Is it hard to find vegetarian options when eating out?
    Luckily, I live in Las Vegas where more healthier options are available, compared to other locations across the map (for instance when I headed down south to Alabama). Dine in restaurants sometimes offer some sort vegetarian option, but I can almost always create vegetable plate out of a menu’s side options. Unfortunately, fast food is where it gets tricky. A non-vegetarian diet is a bit easier for fast food. You can almost always find a grilled chicken sandwich on the menu, but a veggie burger isn’t usually an option. A lot of fast food joints offer salads, but more often than not, they are made up of Iceberg lettuce, and (if you’re lucky) will have a couple of grape tomatoes and a cucumber slice. Not my idea of a complete, well-balanced meal.
  10. Is it hard to go to social gatherings that include eating or pot-lucks?
    It can be, sure. I will usually take something that I feel everyone will like as well, but also something that I know I can depend on if there aren’t more options. You can almost always count on someone bringing a veggie tray, or a fruit tray. Bottom line, this is a way of life that I have adopted and it works well for me. I am not the type of person that will put a damper on someone else’s plans because the menu doesn’t cater to my lifestyle.

    I really enjoy the foods that I eat. I feel satisfied, I feel adequately fueled, and I feel better than I have ever felt. Will I follow this approach to eating forever? I don’t know. It works well for me now and that’s what I have to go by.

    Thanks for stopping in! If you have some banging veggie recipes, feel free to shoot them my way!

    Keep an eye out for my next post, “A full day of eating,”

Hey everyone! It seems as if I have been away from you all for forever! School has been incredibly hectic with exams and assessments, but I had to make some time this morning to share a recent food journey with you all.

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If you follow my food log on Instagram (tiffanydietetics), you have probably noticed that my meals include a lot of greens and fibrous veggies…this is nothing new. What has changed as of recent however, my protein sources. As of June 5th (my 36th birthday), I made the decision to cut out all meat from my diet with the exception of eggs. Although Veganism and Vegetarian diets are more popular now than ever, I know there are many of my fellow bodybuilding friends out there that are saying, “What the hell for?”

I made this decision after completing an assessment for school regarding the effects of a Vegan diet on muscle building. Not only was the information completely opposite of everything I thought I knew, but study after study in my opinion, showed a vegetarian diet to be the healthiest nutritional approach of all.

I would assume this transition would be hard for a lot people, but I can say in all honesty  I haven’t had any struggles. I traded red meat and pork about a year ago for turkey and chicken, so I didn’t have those cravings to worry about. Becoming bored with eggs was a concern in the beginning, but that was never an issue either.

The main highlight of this trial for me has been the loads of energy. Granted, I have since been reverse dieting to increase my overall caloric intake for winter gains, but I noticed the energy increase immediately.

So, were there any downsides? There was something that I found to be really odd and random, and I will say that it almost made me pull the plug on the Vegetarian trial and call it a day…Cellulite!!! What?! Ok, slow down. Don’t let this be a determining factor if you are considering the Vegan road. Let me explain. When I decided to take on this journey I was mid-way through my summer shredding program, which meant a lower carb intake than usual. I knew that once changing to a vegetarian approach I would have to switch up my macros, which automatically meant an increase in carbohydrates to make up for the decrease in protein. Because I had been in a deficit, my carbohydrate intake was around 160 grams per day. When I made the switch, I increased those carbs immediately to 200 grams per day. For someone like myself that doesn’t eat a lot of processed foods to reach 200 grams a day, is a lot when you’ve been in a deficit; therefor, this meant adding in more grains. Don’t get me wrong, I love oats and brown rice, and these are staples in my diet year round; however, when Im doing a cut, I had rather fill my belly with loads of fibrous veggies. Well, keep in mind, I had been doing a cut for about 10 weeks, so my body hadn’t been accustomed to all the grains I was now packing in to make up for the carb increase.  Am I saying that grains give you cellulite?! NO! I am saying that carbohydrates absorb water. When the body is not familiar with something, and then you throw something at it, out of the norm, it’s going to respond negatively. Just like most females, I hold any excess fat in my hips and butt.  I manage to keep excess fat at bay, and stay relatively lean year round, which keeps cellulite to a minimum, but we all have a dimple here and there. But man, oh man…one week in and I was stressing. I felt heavy  and fluffy, and a bit dimply all over. I was ready to call it quits. The best comparison I can give is that feeling when you have had way too much Chinese food and the next day you feel like a puffer fish. Thats how I felt for an entire week. Basically, the increase in carbs was causing me to retain loads of water, and my body wasn’t accustomed to that. To fix the problem, I simply increased my water intake. Although it sounds counter-active, an increase in water will keep you from retaining water, so that was my approach. I also coupled the increased water intake with an am HIIT session everyday for the following week, which forced me to sweat, A lot.

Week one was a hurdle, but by week two I felt great. I stuck to my Ovo-Vegetarian approach for just over 15-weeks. Week 16, I gorged on sushi with my fellow foodies following the Olympia. I have had chicken twice since my Vegetarian food journey, and have since cut it back out as well.

As of now, I will continue my vegetarian journey. Feel free to follow along as I share my thoughts on this approach to nutrition.

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Good morning you all. I believe my last blog entry was an introduction to my interpretation of “wellness” a couple of weeks back. Today I want to address questions that I often get asked regarding flexible dieting versus a diet constructed of whole foods.

Take the picture below for example: both options provide 500 calories. So if you look at it scientifically, no matter the food choice, 500 calories is 500 calories. A calorie is defined as the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius; therefor, no matter where the calories come from, a calorie is still a calorie.  

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So what does flexible dieting mean? Flexible dieting is just as its name depicts. As long as your macros (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) fit within the totals that are prescribed for your diet (whether it be for weight gain or weight loss), then you will yield results. 

A diet that is constructed of whole foods means that the individual chooses foods that are non-processed and in there most natural state. The same goes for this approach, as long as your macros (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) fit within the totals that are prescribed for your diet (whether it be for weight gain or weight loss), then you will yield results.

So if both styles yield the same results when it comes to fat loss (or gain), then what is the best approach, or the correct approach to a strategic diet. I will share with you all my personal opinion of each approach and the reasoning behind my choices.

To begin, I want to address my thoughts on flexible dieting. Flexible dieting is an approach to eating that allows you to eat any food you want as long as you can fit it into your prescribed totals. I personally find that this approach works great for a variety of people: those that are new to dieting, those with an untrained palate, individuals that like to incorporate “treat meals,” and the list goes on. Most individuals are familiar with a typical American diet. Americans tend to consume a lot of high-sodium, high-fat, processed foods. If you take an individual such as this and remove all of the foods that they currently consume and replace them with broiled fish and broccoli, the chances of them sticking to this unfamiliarity is slim. If the individual can still consume their usual Tuesday evening Tyson chicken nuggets with the only change being to bake them in the oven and trade in the traditional ranch dipping sauce for a healthier yogurt based dressing, they will be more apt to follow a plan.

How many times have you heard someone say, or have even said yourself, “I don’t like vegetables,” often followed with admission of having never tried it, or haven’t tried it since the initial taste (years prior). If I gave this person a menu constructed mainly of fibrous veggies, then he/she would probably do one of two things: one, he/she would totally skimp on the veggies all together not meeting their totals for the day, or second, he/she goes on a binger three days in because their body is craving everything it’s not allowing for.

I think for someone to dive head first into a new eating pattern and replace everything they are familiar with is a disaster waiting to happen. The flexible approach can be a great introduction to healthier eating patterns, not only for those new to calorie (macro) tracking, but can be extremely beneficial for those that suffer from an unhealthy relationship with food. 

What about the “whole foods” approach to nutrition? Whole foods are foods that are unprocessed, meaning they have no additives or preservatives. This menu consists of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts and legumes. Most often than not, you will find those who adhere to a whole foods approach are thoroughly interested in the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) of each food just as well. The idea of a whole foods diet is for improving health and preventing disease. Heavily processed foods are full of refined flours and processed sugars often replacing the numerous beneficial Photochemicals and Antioxidants. 

You have heard “you are what you eat?” Well, if you aren’t getting enough micronutrients (those vitamins and minerals that prevent certain cancers), then what are you eating? Often the most recent fad-diet online is what people believe to be truth, and unfortunately this information is usually incorrect.

 

Here’s what it comes down to, and its pretty simple really. Everything in life is about balance. We are human and one of our primary pleasures in life is food. If you find yourself consuming more processed foods than whole foods, make certain that you are choosing options low in fat and fortified with essential nutrients. Also, try slowly implementing vegetables into your meals to familiarize (or introduce) your palate to new flavors. If you aren’t consuming 3-5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day with two of those being greens, then it is wise to consider supplementing with a multi-vitamin (women over the age of 30 should consider adding an additional calcium supplement paired with Vitamin D).

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A healthy diet is one that helps to maintain or improve overall health. This doesn’t mean that you can’t be seduced by the occasional piece of  chocolate cake.

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I get questioned regularly, “if I am going to drink alcohol, what is the healthiest choice and can I fit it into my macros?” Below I have tried to provide the easiest explanation of how to track alcohol into your macros.

HOW TO TRACK ALCOHOL INTO YOUR MACROS

Doing the Math
When it comes to calories, alcohol has 7 calories per 1 gram. This is very dense especially compared to the main macronutrients:
1 gram of carbohydrate = 4 calories
1 gram of protein = 4 calories
1 gram of fat = 9 calories
1 gram of pure alcohol = 7 calories
Alcohol is tracked as carbs or fats.
To track as carb: Take the total amount of calories in your alcoholic beverage and divide by 4.
To track as fat: Take the total amount of calories in your alcoholic beverage and divide by 9.
Or split between the two.
Example: if a drink has 200 calories you could track as:
Carbs 200/4 = 50 grams of carbs
Fats 200/9= 22.2 grams of fat
Both 100/4= 25 grams of carbs
100/9= 11.1 grams of fats

Alcohol takes up a lot of Macros!! Most people think that choosing “lighter” choices (vodka, light beer), that it means a lower carb count, but “alcohol” calories turn to fat easier than carbs!!!

Below I have given an example of how to track a vodka and water in your macros:
• 
2 oz of Vodka = 130 calories
• 130 calories/ 4 (calories in carbs) = the same as 32 carbs

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This means that if you want a vodka and water with dinner, then you must take away 32 carbs from your meal (which is equivalent to 5 oz of sweet potato).

Don’t get me wrong, we all love a night out, or a drink at home, but just be mindful and take each drink into consideration.

Top tier athletes know that success depends on nutrition. Carefully choosing the foods you eat will determine your success. By eating wisely, you will reap the benefits of being properly fueled-Maximize muscle growth, aide recovery and correctly replenish glycogen stores 🍆🍳🍖🍎🍌🍗🍠🍅🍊

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It takes diet AND exercise:

Weight loss is generally 75 percent diet and 25 percent exercise, so it starts in the kitchen.
So, what should you eat? I personally feel that a diet consumed of meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and natural sugar is best.  But just as important as knowing what foods to eat, accurate and precise consumption is necessary to optimize physical performance. A good diet will increase energy, sense of well being, while simultaneously flensing fat and packing on muscle. When properly composed, the right diet can nudge every important quantifiable marker for health in the right direction. Diet is critical to optimizing human function.
It’s true that low-carb diets tend to be the most popular because they offer the fastest results, but they can be difficult to sustain and lead to more serious habits (binge eating). Striving for a more balanced plan that focuses on fruits and veggies, lean proteins and healthy fats keep you sustained while regulating glycogen levels- and never cut calories too low (this causes your metabolism to slow, and you can start losing muscle mass).
While you can lose weight with diet alone, exercise is just as an important component. Without it, only a portion of your weight loss is from fat — you’re also stripping away muscle and bone density (no-one wants to be “skinny-fat”).
It’s a no-brainer that diet and exercise are both crucial to your well-being and your waistline. While diet and exercise are both important for long-term weight loss, remember this: “You can’t out-exercise a bad diet.”

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Beef liver is one of the most nutrition packed foods in the world.  In fact, it is 100 times more nutritious than muscle meat. It is one of the richest  sources of amino acids compared to other protein sources; essential for body cell growth, repairs and regeneration.

While it’s true that fresh fruits and veggies are full of vitamins and minerals, their micronutrient content doesn’t  always hold up to what is found in meats and organ meats – especially liver.

Most animal foods contain some amount of vitamin B12, but by far, the best source is liver which should be eaten at least once a week. Many disorders of the nervous system result from vitamin B12 deficiency causing a myriad of illnesses and behaviors (less than optimal functioning brain and nervous system, such as difficulty in thinking and remembering, panic attacks, weakness, loss of balance, numbness in the hands and feet, or agitated depression). Beef liver plays vital roles in the production of genetic materials and red blood cells and in neurological health.

The same serving of beef liver supplies 917 percent of the adult female RDA for vitamin A and 713 percent of the adult male RDA. Vitamin A is integral to vital organ, immune, vision and reproductive functions and is also active in cell communication, growth and differentiation. A slice of beef liver also offers 212 percent of the adult female RDA for riboflavin and 179 percent of the adult male RDA. Riboflavin helps your body metabolize food and maintain vision and skin health.

A popular objection to eating liver is the belief that the liver is a storage organ for toxins in the body. While it is true that one of the liver’s role is to neutralize toxins (such as drugs, chemical agents and poisons), it does not store these toxins. Toxins the body cannot eliminate are likely to accumulate in the body’s fatty tissues and nervous systems.

It is recommend to incorporate organ meat into your diet at least twice per week.  In fact, the more organ meat in your diet, the better, especially if it’s grass-fed.  Because the flavor can be challenging for some and because cooking organ meat can be daunting, I am sharing my favorite way to prepare beef liver 🙂

Ingredients:

100-115 gram sliver of beef liver (about 1/2 inch thick)
1 Tbsp. organic, salt free butter
2 Tbsp. coconut flour
2 tsp garlic salt
1 Egg

Directions:
Whisk one egg and pour into a Ziploc bag. Add beef liver, seal and lightly shake until evenly saturated. Add coconut flour, seal and lightly shake until coated (some may prefer more breading- in this case add more egg and flour).
Using a cast iron skillet over low-medium heat, melt 1/2 Tbsp butter then add liver and sprinkle with 1 tsp garlic salt. After 3-5 minutes, remove liver, adding 1 Tbsp butter and cook liver on opposite side, sprinkle with 1 tsp garlic salt.

Serve with caramelized onions and grilled asparagus.

 

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100g of bananas, 100g of grapefruit, 50g of apple, 1 egg, 4 egg whites- Macros: 25P/40P/5F
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200g of broccoli, 3oz of chicken cooked in 1T of coconut oil, 50g of avocado, 90g of brown rice, 2T of salsa- Macros: 30P/50C/15F
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Western scramble: 2 fried eggs topped with 3oz of chicken, 150g of mixed peppers and onions, taco sauce and ms. dash southwestern spice- Macros: 35P/10C/12F
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64g of rice topped with 4oz of grilled shrimp cooked in 1tsp of coconut oil, 1 egg over easy and 40g of avocado- Macros: 30P/25C/12F
Post-Workout Smoothie: 1/2 banana, 50g mixed berries, 1 scoop of protein, 1/2T almond butter- Macros: 25P/20C/5F
1/2 scoop any flavor protein, 2T PB2 mixed with water, add 140g mixed berries, 10g crushed nuts- Macros: 15P/20C/10F

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Macro Prepping Vlogs:

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                           To see more meal ideas: RECIPES

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What is fat?
Fats, known chemically as the molecules triesters of glycerol (triglycerides) and fatty acids, are one of the three macronutrients (fats, carbohydrates, proteins). Fat is vital for body processes such as digestion, transport, conversion, and energy extraction. It’s our body’s primary source for stored energy, and by weight, it contains three times the amount of energy provided by glucose which must be provided to the brain in a continuous supply throughout the day. We can’t survive without fat.

Fat is necessary for many reasons.
Digestion – Fat is not soluble in blood, so bile acids produced from cholesterol in the liver emulsify it along the way to make it bioavailable. It stores the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K in the liver and fatty tissues. Because fat needs to be broken down through multiple processes that include the stomach, duodenum, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, and small intestine, it stays around for a long time and keeps you satiated.
Transport – Fat is part of every cell membrane in the body. It helps transport nutrients and metabolites across cell membranes.
Conversion Your body utilizes fat for everything from activating hormones to building immune function.
Energy extraction – Between meals or when glucose is not available, triglycerides are broken down and metabolized for energy, which in times of great need, the brain’s neurons can utilize.
Nervous system – The axon is the part of a nerve (neuron) that transmits electrical signals from the brain throughout the body to initiate all functions. The axon’s protective coating is the myelin sheath and is made of 80% lipids (fats) that must be provided by the diet.

What‘s the difference between brown fat and white fat?
Brown fat is abundant with mitochondria, which give it the rich brownish red color. Mitochondria’s function is respiration and energy production. It produces ATP (adenosine triphosphate) by using the energy stored in food, in this case, fat. Brown fat burns calorie-intense lipids, releases stored energy and creates heat.
White fat stores lipids but doesn’t burn them, creating unhealthy belly fat. This is the type of fat that makes people “fat”. When too much white fat is accumulated, we gain the wrong kind of weight. Subcutaneous fat like the kind that’s been stored around the belly, thighs, or butt can’t be burned without new dietary fat, which triggers fat-burning channels through the liver.

Understanding fats:
Saturated fats:
These fats are solid at room temperature, given their carbon chain. Most of them are long chain fatty acids. Dairy fats are saturated fats and often ridiculed. But if one is careful enough to choose milk obtained from grass fed cows and not cattle fed on grains and corn, as these fats are healthier.
Saturated oils like coconut oils are in fact more beneficial for someone suffering from a liver disease or kidney disease as they are medium chain fatty acids and are assimilated well in the body’s digestive system. Saturated fats like red meat, egg yolk, butter should be had very sparingly.

Unsaturated – Monounsaturated fats:
There are two kinds of unsaturated fats- monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, depending on the bonds their carbon atoms have. Mostly all cooking oils are unsaturated fats. When it comes to choosing the right oil it is essential to consider the ratio of mono to polyunsaturated fats present in the oil. Monounsaturated oils are more stable and hence oxidize very slowly in the body. Oils like rice bran oil, olive oil and groundnut oils are monounsaturated. They have properties, which can lower the total cholesterol and increase the HDL-the good cholesterol.

Summary
Fats are an essential part of our body’s metabolism. So, understand their different forms and incorporate them in your daily diets accordingly. Also, at the end of the day, a good fat is also a fat, carrying the same amount of calories. For example, 1 tablespoon of fat is 100 calories approximately. It is the rate of digestion, the assimilation and processing of these fats in the body that determine our cholesterol, our adipose tissue- the fat stored in the tissues. So consider creating a balance by using the right kinds of fats in the right proportion.

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Keto-Diet
What exactly is Ketosis? The metabolic state of ketosis simply means that the quantity of ketone bodies in the blood have reached higher-than-normal levels. When the body is in a ketogenic state, this means that lipid energy metabolism is intact. The body will start breaking down your own body fat to fuel the body’s normal, everyday functions.

What are the benefits of establishing this metabolic state of ketosis?

The main benefit of ketosis is that it increases the body’s ability to utilize fats for fuel, which gets very lazy on a high-carbohydrate diet. When on high-carbohydrate diets, the body can usually expect an energy source to keep entering the body. But in the state of ketosis, the body has to become efficient at mobilizing fats as energy.

Ketosis has a protein-sparing effect, assuming that you are consuming adequate quantities of protein and calories—0.7 grams per pound of body weight per day—in the first place.1 Once in ketosis, the body actually prefers ketones to glucose. Since the body has copious quantities of fat, this means there is no need to oxidize protein to generate glucose through gluconeogenesis.

Another benefit has to do with the low levels of insulin in the body, which causes greater lipolysis and free-glycerol release compared to a normal diet when insulin is around 80-120. Insulin has a lipolysis-blocking effect, which can inhibit the use of fatty acids as energy. Also, when insulin is brought to low levels, beneficial hormones are released in the body, such as growth hormone and other powerful growth factors.

Another small but very important benefit of the ketogenic diet is that when in the state of ketosis, ketones, along with a high protein intake, seem to suppress appetite. A high-carbohydrate diet, on the other hand, increases hunger levels. Because you have to consume a lot of fat on a ketogenic diet, which hold 9 calories per gram, you are not getting much food volume. It’s not mandatory to be hungry on a reduced-calorie diet.

DOES BEING IN THE METABOLIC STATE OF KETOSIS PRESENT DANGERS?
I feel the benefits of the ketogenic diet outweigh the pitfalls, but as with any diet, speak with your doctor first. Some of the points of arguments are:

During the first few weeks of the ketogenic diet, the body has to go through the “metabolic shift,”. While going through this, the body will experience a small degree of fatigue, brain fog, and even dehydration due to the increased water loss associated with ketoic-induced diuresis and water loss from depletion of glycogen stores.

Once the body gets used to manufacturing ketones as the main energy substrate, the body actually has more energy than it previously had, and you won’t have to be fighting through all those low-blood-sugar crashes your high-carb meals previously gave you. Additionally, hydration should be an area of high priority, especially before, during, and after exercise.

Blood-lipid profile is also a concern on the ketogenic diet due to the staggering amounts of saturated fats in the diet, although the diet can be centered around healthier unsaturated fats—which isn’t as fun as eating an egg and cheese omelet, fried in butter, with bacon on the side!

Blood-lipid-profile issues are experiencing much debate; some people following the ketogenic diet will experience a drop in cholesterol levels, but for some people, cholesterol levels will increase.

Because carbohydrates are restricted to less than 50 grams a day, the issue of micronutrient deficiencies can occur. Thiamin, folate, calcium, iron, potassium, and magnesium are typically inadequate in low-carb diets. The best thing to do to avoid this is to make sure you take a high-quality multivitamin to ensure you get 100 percent of the daily value. Also supplementing with a fiber supplement is a good idea to make sure your plumbing doesn’t get clogged.

Ketoacidosis occurs when the level of ketones in the blood gets out of control, which poses a severe health risk for diabetics. When massive quantities of ketones are produced, the pH level of the blood drops, creating a high-acidic environment. Nondiabetics need not fear, as the regulated and controlled production of ketone bodies allows the blood pH to remain within normal limits.