Neuroendocrine refers to interactions between the nervous system and the endocrine system. Muscle growth and strength increase largely depend on the neuroendocrine adaptations and acute responses evoked during exercise.
Unfortunately, one of the critical elements missing from isolation ‘weight-training’ movements (ex. bicep curls) is they invoke essentially no Neuroendocrine response.
A vital hormonal response to athletic development is a substantial testosterone increase, along with an insulin-like growth factor and human growth hormone. Exercising with protocols known to elevate these hormones eerily mimics the hormonal changes sought in exogenous hormonal therapy (steroid use). Training Programs that induce a high neuroendocrine response produce top tier athletes. Increased muscle mass and bone density are just two of many adaptive responses to exercises capable of producing a significant Neuro. response.
A starting point recommended for Weightlifting would be mastering Powerlifting
(the sport of three lifts: the Bench Press, Squat and Deadlift), to be followed later by the more dynamic Clean & Jerk and the Snatch. Being not only demanding of precision and athleticism, but these multi-joint compounds also elicit a profound Neuroendocrine response, emphasizing constant engagement of midline, working core to extremities.
Simply put, in order to maximize neuroendocrine response, focus on working large muscle groups before smaller muscle groups. Use higher volume and moderate to high intensity with shorter rest intervals between sets.
If you are not an avid Olympic Weightlifter, activate a higher Neuro response by programming your smaller muscle groups with your largest muscle groups. (ex. Superset your bicep curls with deadlifts, your tricep extensions with bench press, shoulder laterals with squats). Recruit an even larger response by incorporating Compound movements (ex. a front squat with an overhead press, a sumo deadlift with an upright row, a back squat with a wide grip behind the neck Press).
Maximize your natural growth hormone by recruiting more muscle fibers, more quickly, and more intensely.

I often get asked about weightlifting shoes. Are they really worth the investment? I always reply the same way- Would an avid runner wear shoes that are made for hiking? Probably not. Shoes are designed for specific sports and activities. Running shoes have an inbuilt cushion to absorb impact with each step you take. Although this is great for running, it’s not so great for Weightlifting. Rather than absorb force, you need a shoe that will help you use all the force your body produces to help you move the weight. The more force you can produce, the more weight you can move. This is especially important in Olympic Lifts.

Weightlifting shoes have a raised heel. This is a massive advantage, as it allows you to squat into a deeper position through an increased ankle range of motion. This will help you to improve your overall position too, as you’ll find yourself sitting more upright. A more upright torso means more chance of keeping hold of the barbell in the correct plane and sending it in the right direction-up.

Weightlifting shoes are also extremely stable, not just underfoot, but around your foot. This ensures a strong and consistent base to land on, push through, and push into- exceptional performance and injury prevention.

Weightlifting shoes are more stable than your typical barefoot or minimalist shoe. The concept of these shoes having little or no padding is definitely in the right direction (and I had personally rather wear this type of shoe when performing the Deadlift, ensuring maximal force through the ground), but while performing other major lifts (The Clean and Jerk, Snatch and Squat), I personally think weightlifting shoes are more beneficial.